Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Magical Realism Inquiry

This one's out of left field, but I'll throw it to whoever stops by here.

Does anyone know of a work that makes use of 'Magical Realism', yet which is not A) pretty obnoxious, and B) not clearly written with a leftist/SJW bend? All the better if C) it's written with a conservative bend.

I'm curious of something along those lines.

7 comments:

Graham Esposito said...

I've heard people use that term in regards to Birdman.

GoldRush Apple said...

I second Graham's post. I'm not sure if it has #3, though.

Graham Esposito said...

Now that I've had time to think about it in regards to number 3, I guess if you were really motivated, you could make a case that Chesterton's "The Ball and the Cross" could fall under a magical realism umbrella.

Craig said...

Is Kafka's "Metamorphosis" left-wing?

B. Prokop said...

Anything written by Charles Williams. Seriously.

grodrigues said...

What do you mean by "Magical Realism"? The first name that popped in my mind was the Colombian novelist Garcia Marquez, but I somehow suspect that that is not what you have in mind.

B. Prokop said...

grodrigues,

Here's a useful description of MR from THIS WEBSITE.

Magical realism is not speculative and does not conduct thought experiments. Instead, it tells its stories from the perspective of people who live in our world and experience a different reality from the one we call objective. If there is a ghost in a story of magical realism, the ghost is not a fantasy element but a manifestation of the reality of people who believe in and have "real" experiences of ghosts. Magical realist fiction depicts the real world of people whose reality is different from ours. It's not a thought experiment. It's not speculation. Magical realism endeavors to show us the world through other eyes. When it works, as I think it does very well in, say, Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Ceremony, some readers will inhabit this other reality so thoroughly that the "unreal" elements of the story, such as witches, will seem frighteningly real long after the book is finished. A fantasy about southwestern Indian witches allows you to put down the book with perhaps a little shiver but reassurance that what you just read is made up. Magical realism leaves you with the understanding that this world of witches is one that people really live in and the feeling that maybe this view is correct.