Friday, August 5, 2016

Next time doesn't always come

It's quite a sight, watching conservatives play the nobler-than-thou game, announcing that they refuse to support Trump because they cannot suffer his brash character. No, they're holding out for a Constitutionalist, and a genteel Christian soul at that. Despite settling for a wishy-washy mormon and the abomination that is John McCain, they cannot abide a candidate who behaves so rudely.

I wonder if they realize that, in some ways, they are fighting for their very survival at this point. They are one mass amnesty away from their Constitutionalist fantasies being dashed for good, and one selection of SCOTUS justices away from a whole lot worse. I suspect, if Trump fails to win, that in 4 years we're not going to see these guys getting their choice of a more satisfying conservative to pin their hopes on. Instead they're going to start bitterly talking about how 2016 was actually their last chance for a vote to matter, and how angry they are that Trump was so -rude- that he obscured their ability to realize it.

Of course, when faced with this possibility, a chunk of them start waxing poetic - imaging how noble they're going to be, going down in defeat while clinging to their principles. The big problem there is that mental image is very Plato, or cinematic - it's an ideal, not the reality. In their heads, they lift their chins and look off into the distance, solid in their hope that while their generation may have fallen, they shall yet set the stage for someone else to rediscover what they tried and failed to protect, perhaps in 100, 200 years. End scene, cue credits. The following decades - the potentially very messy, very violent decades - are not dwelled upon.

2 comments:

Mike said...

The big problem there is that mental image is very Plato, or cinematic - it's an ideal, not the reality. In their heads, they lift their chins and look off into the distance, solid in their hope that while their generation may have fallen, they shall yet set the stage for someone else to rediscover what they tried and failed to protect, perhaps in 100, 200 years. End scene, cue credits. The following decades - the potentially very messy, very violent decades - are not dwelled upon.

And yet it was the most liberal agitator of the founding generation, Payne, who basically said (paraphrasing) "I don't desire war, but if there is to be war, let it be in my prime, not in the age of my sons as men." These men don't even rise to the level of a punk like Payne; they'd rather their great grandkids rebuild what they're too nice to fight for.

Tpc said...

They're not going to have great grandchildren